The Chronological Gospel –

The Empty Tomb

Random Walk in a Gallery of Religious Art, Step 49: Luke 24:1-9, The Resurrection, by Carl Heinrich Bloch
Matthew 28:1-4; John 20:1-18, Sunday, very early. Mary Magdalene, Peter, and (probably) John
Luke 24:1; Mark 16:3-4; Luke 24:3-7; Matthew 28:6-10; Luke 24:9-11, Sunday. The women meet angels and Jesus; the disciples don’t believe it.
Matthew 28:11-15, Sunday, The cover-up
Luke 24:13-32, Sunday afternoon. Jesus speaks to two disciples on the road.
Luke 24:33-36a; John 20:19b; Luke 24:37-40; Mark 16:14b-18; Luke 24:41-43; John 20:20b-29, Sunday evening. Jesus speaks to his disciples

More of The Chronological Gospel

Copyright information, disclaimers, and sponsors
Return to homepage


Random Walk in a Gallery of Religious Art, Step 49: Luke 24:1-9, The Resurrection, by Carl Heinrich Bloch (8/6/15)

I like Carl Bloch’s stone: it isn’t rolled away, it’s blown away! And if we aren’t blown away by the resurrection, we should be.

Previous Step. Next Step.

The resurrection of Christ. Click to enlarge. See below for provenance.
"The Resurrection" by Carl Heinrich Bloch, from the Gamble family Bible, now in the private collection of Regina Hunter. Photography by Daryl Lee.


Matthew 28:1-4; John 20:1-18, Sunday, very early. Mary Magdalene, Peter, and (probably) John (10/28/14)

All four gospels name Mary Magdalene as either the first person or as one of the first people to see Jesus after his resurrection. All four gospels say that one or more women went to the tomb around daybreak. After that, things get a little confusing, which is what we should expect. No one was expecting the resurrection, and no one (except maybe John, who is almost certainly “the other disciple”) understood it at the time. All four gospel writers either had their own experiences or had talked to various people who were eyewitnesses to a unique event. It’s sort of amazing that there’s any consistency at all among the six reports that we have about that Sunday.

Luke 24:1; Mark 16:3-4; Luke 24:3-7; Matthew 28:6-10; Luke 24:9-11, Sunday. The women meet angels and Jesus; the disciples don’t believe it. (10/29/14)

Another item that all four Gospels agree on is that the women met angels at the tomb, and their reactions included terror, amazement, and joy. All of these are completely appropriate, as we saw in our study of angels. Pay close attention to vss. 9-11 at the end. The women reported what they had learned to the disciples, who didn’t believe it.

Matthew 28:11-15, Sunday, The cover-up (10/30/14)

Neither conspiracy theories nor cover-ups are new. To be fair, it sort of sounds like everybody involved thought someone else had stolen Jesus’ body. By this time, most people had no idea that there might have been a resurrection, and even some of those who had been told about it thought it was fantasy.


Luke 24:13-32, Sunday afternoon. Jesus speaks to two disciples on the road (10/31/14)

Cleopas and his friend seem not to be mentioned elsewhere in the Bible than in this passage from Luke, although the “long ending” of Mark does summarize the incident in two verses (Mark 16:12-13). I don’t find it surprising that the two did not recognize Jesus immediately. For one thing, they don’t seem to have been among his intimate associates. For another, twice I’ve failed to recognize my very own granddaughter for a second when I’ve seen her out of context, and nobody has ever been so out of context as Jesus on resurrection day!


Luke 24:33-36a; John 20:19b; Luke 24:37-40; Mark 16:14b-18; Luke 24:41-43; John 20:20b-29, Sunday evening. Jesus speaks to his disciples. (11/3/14)

Jesus appeared to many people after his resurrection, most of whom didn’t believe it. Well, that makes a lot of sense to me – the last time they had seen him, he had been beaten, scourged, nailed to a cross, stabbed in the side, dead, and buried. Now, three days later, he seemed to be fine! You and I wouldn’t have believed it either, especially not without seeing it for ourselves. I like Thomas a lot. He wants the proof of his own eyes, but once he has it, he is the first person to acknowledge Jesus not only as Lord, but also as God.

By the way, the material italicized by Weymouth is from the “long ending” of Mark, added very early in the first century after the original ending (if Mark ever wrote one) was lost. It is perfectly scriptural.

More of The Chronological Gospel

Birth Announcements and Early Lives of Jesus and John the Baptist
Early Ministries of Jesus and John the Baptist
Jesus’ Early Ministry
Jesus’ Galilean Ministry
Sabbath Controversies
The Sermon on the Mount
The Sermon on the Plain
John the Baptist
Signs and Parables
Miracles and Mission Trips
Bread of Life
Miracles and Meanings
Transfiguration and Teachings
To Jerusalem for the Festival of Tabernacles
Some Results of Luke’s Research
Light
More of Luke’s Research
On the Road Again
The Raising of Lazarus
Holy Week: Palm Sunday and Monday
Holy Week: Tuesday, Parables and Questions
Holy Week: Wednesday Part 1, Discussions
Holy Week: Wednesday Part 2, Be Ready!
Holy Week: Thursday Part 1, Jesus' Celebration of the Passover
Holy Week: Thursday Part 2, Jesus' Farewell Discourse
Holy Week: Friday Part 1, Jesus' Arrest and Two Informal Trials
Holy Week: Friday Part 2, More Trials
Holy Week: Friday, Part 3, and Saturday, Jesus' Death and Burial
The Empty Tomb
Final Appearances of Jesus Prior to Pentecost

Copyright 2014, 2015, 2016 by Regina L. Hunter. All rights reserved. Scripture readings are from the Weymouth New Testament (1912). This page has been prepared for the web site by RPB.

Opinions expressed on this page are solely those of the author, Regina Hunter, and may or may not be shared by the sponsors or the Bible-study participants.  Thanks to the Holy Spirit for any useful ideas presented here, and thanks to all the readers for their support and enthusiasm.  All errors are, of course, the sole responsibility of the author.

Our Sponsors:

St. John’s United Methodist Church, “Transforming Lives Through Christ.”
2626 Arizona NE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87110
Traditional worship services are held Sundays at 8:15 and 11:00 a.m. in the sanctuary.  Casual worship services are held Sundays at 9:30 a.m. in the Family Life Center.  Jazz Vespers are held monthly on the second Saturday at 5:00 p.m. in the sanctuary. St. John’s feels especially called to the worship of God and to the service of our neighbors through our music program.

Storm Dragon SoftwareTM
Get a free demo of our computer adventure game, full of hidden-object puzzles, tiling and jigsaw puzzles, cycling puzzles, and more.

Age Games: Animal ReaderTM
Computer games that children can play all by themselves!

Ducks in a Row, Inc., developers of Home Safe SoftwareTM.
Keep It SafeTM - Home inventory software so easy anybody can use it.